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24
Jul
2019

Gums keep your teeth secure, protect your oral bones, and battle against bacteria on a daily basis. While we take care to make sure that our teeth are properly cleaned daily, we can often forget to take care of our gums. An easy way to make sure your gums are getting the healthy support they need is through your diet. Read on to discover the best gum-loving foods that you can easily incorporate into your meals to give them an extra daily boost.

Onions

Onions have been proven to be a fantastic food for healthy gums because they neutralize oral bacteria. They have microbial properties that target the most common types of bacteria that cause gum disease and cavities. For great gums, try incorporating more onions into your meals as salad toppers, in sandwiches and burgers, in stir fries, and in soups, stews, and chilis.

Leafy greens

Vegetables like kale and spinach are filled to the brim with mouth-healthy vitamins and minerals. Specifically, they hold vitamin C, which boosts the production of red blood cells and reduces inflammation. Both these benefits battle against irritation and gum disease. Leafy greens require more chewing, thanks to their high fibre content, which is good for gums because the chewing action creates more saliva. This helps to flush out food particles, bacteria, and plaque that may be sticking to your teeth near the gum line. Revamp your diet with power-packed greens by creating salads with them, adding them as a cooked side dish to main meals, and putting them in soups and sandwiches.

Green tea

There is some research which shows that this antioxidant-rich tea can help stave off inflammation in the body. Green tea has specific antioxidants which help gums fight inflammation caused by the one of the types of oral bacteria responsible for gum disease. Try drinking a cup of green tea daily to give your gums a healthy boost.

Peppers and citrus fruits

Vitamin C is also high in vegetables like peppers of all colors and acidic fruits such as oranges, kiwis, pineapple, and strawberries. Add them into your diet to reap the benefits of this anti-inflammatory vitamin through smoothies, with yogurt, and in salads.

Shiitake mushrooms

Lentinan is an antibacterial compound found in shiitake mushrooms and it fights against plaque-building bacteria in the mouth. This type of bacteria breeds in hard to reach places in the mouth such as in between teeth and along the gum line, and can cause irritation and possibly lead to gingivitis and gum disease. You can incorporate shiitake mushrooms into your meals in a variety of different ways. Try sautéing them as a side to a main course or chopping them up and adding them to whatever vegetable dish you prepare.

Celery, carrots, and apples

Foods that are very crunchy are excellent at scraping away stuck on food and plaque. The hard bits of foods like celery, carrots, and apples get in between teeth and into tooth crevices and can help keep your mouth fresh between brushing. Crunchy fruits and vegetables also happen to be high in fiber, which, again, means they take longer to chew and generate more saliva. Saliva is great for flushing the mouth of bacteria near the gum line. Simply add these foods to your daily diet as snacks to help get rid of food particles between meals.

Milk, yogurt, and cheese

Dairy products are great for teeth because they are high in calcium, a mineral that helps to strengthen bone, but they are also great for your gums. This is because of a protein called casein that is found in most dairy products which helps to neutralize oral acids that are produced by bacteria in the mouth. These acids can be destructive to tooth enamel and gum tissue, leading to irritation or worse. Include a healthy amount of dairy in your diet by drinking a cup of milk daily or by eating snacks that include dairy such as cheese or yogurt.

(Article Provided by 123dentist.com)
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3
Jul
2019

Many people have an idea that mouthwash is good for their oral health but may not know the specifics of how mouthwash helps. There are many potential benefits of mouthwash but these benefits depend on the product and how you’re using it. So, how does mouthwash work?

There are two categories of mouthwash: cosmetic and therapeutic. Cosmetic mouthwashes strictly leave a fresh scent and taste in the mouth. These mouthwashes can help cover up bad breathe temporarily.

Therapeutic mouthwashes have active ingredients that are intended to address specific oral health concerns. These mouthwashes may be designed to fight the bacteria that cause bad breath or gingivitis. They could also be designed to provide fluoride to the teeth, control tartar buildup or soothe painful mouth sores.

How to Choose a Mouthwash

When selecting a mouthwash, think about your oral health needs. Prioritize your top two or three reasons for wanting to use mouthwash, and then look for a mouthwash that addresses those issues. For example, if you’re concerned with surface stains on your teeth, look for a whitening mouthwash. If gum health is your concern, you may want to select a mouthwash that kills the bacteria that cause gingivitis.

With so many types of mouthwash available, you’re sure to find a product that suits your current needs. For help choosing the best mouthwash, don’t hesitate to ask your dentist.

Tips for Using Mouthwash

You’re already a pro at brushing and flossing, but you may have some questions about the proper use of mouthwash. You may be wondering whether mouthwash should be used before or after brushing.

Manufacturers may recommend a certain order to maximize the product’s effectiveness, so you should check the label of your chosen mouthwash. In cases where the manufacturer doesn’t make a recommendation, you can rinse either before or after you brush, depending on your preference.

The ideal frequency of mouthwash use is another question you may have.  This depends on the reason you’re using the mouthwash. For people who simply want to keep their teeth clean, the recommendation is swishing with mouthwash twice per day. For people who want the benefits of fluoride, once per day is enough.

While mouthwash can be a good addition to an oral hygiene routine, it’s not a replacement for proper brushing and flossing. Make sure to keep brushing twice per day and flossing once per day, even when you’re using mouthwash.

Choosing the right mouthwash doesn’t have to be complicated. When you go to the store, keep your main oral health concerns in mind and select a product that meets those specific needs. If you’re still not sure which mouthwash is right for you, ask your dentist or dental hygienist for advice.

Be sure to ask Dr. Appleton or any hygienist at the office if you have any questions about the proper use of mouthwash.

 

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27
Jun
2019

Are electric toothbrushes better than manual ones?

The truth is, when topped with fluoride toothpaste to harden the surfaces of your teeth and protect against cavities, either electric or manual toothbrushes can help keep your mouth as  clean as possible. It really just depends on your situation.

Research will typically tell you electric toothbrushes have a slight edge, but it’s honestly not that huge.

Electric toothbrushes generally use vibration, rotation (going around in a circle), or oscillation (moving back and forth) to get the job done. They also tend to have larger handles than manual toothbrushes. These aspects make electric toothbrushes good options for people with dexterity issues due to conditions like arthritis and osteoporosis, or just aging in general.

Since the bristles on electric toothbrushes can sometimes be thinner and pointier clusters, they can deliver the kind of targeted cleaning that can aid someone with braces or dental restorations. It may even just be that the vibrations intrigue an easily distracted kid, helping them spend the recommended two minutes brushing their teeth.  Some electric toothbrushes actually have timers, which can be a great way to make sure you’re spending enough time on your teeth and gums.

Electric toothbrushes can also help if you brush your teeth and gums too hard, which can lead to gum recession that causes sensitivity while eating and drinking. Since electric toothbrushes do a lot of the work to remove plaque, putting too much pressure on your gums becomes less of an issue. Some even have pressure sensors that freeze the toothbrush’s motion if you’re pressing too hard.

No matter what kind of toothbrush you use, you should shop with a few guidelines in mind.

Choose a toothbrush with soft bristles, whether manual or electric. Anything harder can damage your gums and even form little notches in your teeth.

During your twice-daily, two-minute brushings, dentists suggest holding your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle against your teeth and gum line, moving back and forth in short strokes, then tilting vertically and making up and down strokes on the insides of your teeth, too. (If you’re using an electric toothbrush, be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions.)

Beyond that, buy a new toothbrush every three to four months (or swap out the head of your electric toothbrush as instructed). If the bristles are frayed, they’re not going to be able to get into the little crevices around each of your teeth and get the job done and you won’t be as efficient in plaque removal.

The bottom line is that you don’t automatically need an electric toothbrush for great oral health, but it can help in certain situations. People have individual needs and abilities and skills. If an electric toothbrush helps them stay healthy and avoid having additional decay, it can wind up being a good investment. Sometimes it really makes a difference in people who are struggling to stay healthy.

Speak with Dr. Appleton or Dr. Bana at your next dental appointment about the benefits of an electric toothbrush.

Call 905-668-6301 to book an appointment.

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20
Jun
2019

Effective Toothbrushing

We all want to have healthy teeth, fresh breath and nice smiles. Gum disease and tooth decay are the two most common oral diseases worldwide.

Studies have identified links between gum disease and general health such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease and so it has never been more important to look after your teeth.

Effective daily tooth brushing and oral hygiene is an essential part of your health and well-being.

Recommended Toothbrushing Technique

A gentle scrub technique with very short horizontal movements to dislodge plaque at the gum margins is effective for most people and is easy to teach and readily accepted. Thus, careful use of a gentle scrub method using a toothbrush with densely packed, round-ended synthetic filaments of soft to medium texture should be encouraged for effective plaque removal.

A toothbrush with a small brush head may also be recommended, as a small brush head enables better access to the back of the mouth and to tooth surfaces than a large brush head.

While a variety of powered toothbrushes have become increasingly available, only powered toothbrushes with a rotation oscillation action (i.e., brush head moves in one direction and then the other) have been found to be better than manual toothbrushes at removing plaque and reducing gum inflammation, and are no more likely to cause injuries to gums.

Incorrect toothbrushing techniques involving excessive pressure may considerably increase gingival recession (i.e., the gum line recedes leading to exposure of the roots of the teeth), and loss of tooth substance by mechanical abrasion, and must therefore be avoided.

Hold the toothbrush in a pen grip using just the thumb and forefinger.  This results in less pressure being applied when toothbrushing and is therefore recommended.

Toothbrushing Routine

  1. A gentle scrub technique involving very short horizontal movements is recommended
  2. Use a soft to medium textured toothbrush
  3. Hold toothbrush in a pen grip to avoid using excessive pressure
  4. Spit out fluoride toothpaste and do not rinse after brushing
  5. Twice a day – at bedtime and in the morning (ideally after every meal)

Please call Dr. Appleton’s office to schedule your next regular dental checkup.

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12
Jun
2019

Flossing: How Important Is Flossing To You?

 

People hate flossing. Why? Well, for some people, taking out a piece of floss, wrapping it around their index and middle fingers, placing it between two teeth, and then moving it to remove food or dental plaque can be too much of a process. There are easier options to clean between the teeth like dental flossers, toothpicks, interdental brushes and even battery-powered or electrical flossing devices.

Regardless of the method, if you’re someone who just doesn’t like flossing or you don’t fully understand it, it’s crucial to remember why flossing is an important part of a healthy smile.

What Are the Facts?

Recently, the Associated Press has reported that “there’s little proof that flossing works.” This is a bold statement to make to the public, dental professionals and oral care companies who make dental floss. This report claims that there is no scientific research out there that proves flossing helps prevent gum disease and cavities. However, published research in the Journal of Dental Hygiene shows that flossing and tooth brushing will help reduce gingivitis at one, three and six months, but not reduce plaque at one or three months.

So what does this flossing news mean to you?

The Downfalls of Not Flossing

When you don’t floss, you’re at risk for two major dental issues in your mouth: Gingivitis, and cavities between your teeth. Without flossing, you are not able to remove dental plaque buildup. There are over 1,000 bacteria in dental plaque. These bacteria can irritate the gum tissue, causing it to become red and inflamed and bleed easily, which breeds more bacteria and causes gingivitis to occur.

Another risk of not flossing is that cavities are more likely to form between your teeth. The same dental plaque that causes gingivitis can lead to the growth of harmful bacteria that will destroy the enamel between your teeth, consequently forming a cavity.

Oral Health and Overall Health

Gingivitis, if left untreated, can progress to periodontal disease. The bacteria from periodontal disease can enter the bloodstream and travel to other parts of your body like your heart and respiratory tract. Periodontal disease has also been linked to diabetes and can contribute to the risk of low birth weight in newborn babies. An easy way to reduce your risk of other serious side effects from periodontal disease, however, is by practicing optimal oral hygiene at home, which includes flossing and tooth brushing.

Conducting Great Oral Hygiene

You should floss at least once a day, the best time being right before you go to bed to remove any food and plaque from between the teeth and along the gumline. Flossing should be done with waxed floss, as it won’t shred between the teeth.

Use a soft-bristle toothbrush at least twice daily to remove plaque, reduce gingivitis, prevent cavities and provide your mouth with an overall clean healthy feeling.

So, when you see that container of dental floss at your bathroom sink, be motivated to start flossing and help prevent dental diseases from occurring in your mouth!

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5
Jun
2019

Receding Gums


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Receding Gums: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments

Gum recession is when the margin of the gum tissue surrounding the teeth wears away, or pulls back, exposing more of the tooth, or the tooth’s root. When gums recede, gaps can form between the gum and tooth, allowing disease-causing bacteria to build up. If left untreated, the surrounding tissue and bone structures of the teeth can be damaged, sometimes resulting in tooth loss. Receding gums is a widespread dental condition. Most people aren’t aware that they have receding gums since it occurs gradually.

Receding Gums Symptoms

As receding gums progress over time, you may notice the following symptoms:

Long Teeth
One symptom is the visible lengthening of the teeth. When gums recede because of periodontal disease, the teeth have the appearance of being much longer than normal.

Exposed Roots
Exposed roots are another symptom, and can be extremely sensitive and uncomfortable. They are often a sign of periodontal disease or can be attributed to brushing overly aggressively with a toothbrush with hard bristles.

Loose teeth
When suffering from receding gums, you may notice loose teeth, attributed to the bacteria and periodontal disease under the gums around the teeth. As receding gums worsen, the gum pockets deepen due to loss of attachment structure.

Causes of Receding Gums

Numerous factors can cause your gums to recede, including:

Periodontal diseases

  • These are gum infections, caused by bacteria, that destroy gum tissue and the bone that holds your teeth in place. Periodontal disease is the main cause of gum recession. The early stage of periodontal disease is not often painful, therefore symptoms often go unnoticed. Left untreated though, early symptoms can develop into periodontitis.

Early stages of  gum disease can be seen with minor symptoms that include:

  • Red, swollen, or purple gums
  • Gums that feel tender to the touch
  • Bleeding gums
  • Chronic bad breath

Genetics
Some people are more susceptible to periodontal disease. Studies show that 30% of the population may be predisposed to gum disease, even if they take good care of their teeth.

Brushing too hard
If you brush your teeth too aggressively or incorrectly, it can cause your tooth’s enamel to wear away and your gums to recede.

Poor dental care
Inadequate brushing, flossing, and rinsing with antibacterial mouthwash, can make it easy for plaque to turn into tartar, a hard substance that forms on and between your teeth and can only be removed by a professional tooth cleaning.

Hormone levels
Changes in estrogen levels over a woman’s life, like puberty, pregnancy, and menopause, can make gums increasingly sensitive and vulnerable to gum recession.

Tobacco products
Smokers, and other tobacco users, are more likely to develop sticky plaque which can cause gum recession.

Grinding and clenching your teeth
Clenching or grinding your teeth can exert too much force on the teeth, causing gums to recede.

Crooked teeth or a misaligned bite
When teeth don’t come together evenly, too much force can be exerted on the gums and surrounding bone, allowing gums to recede.

Receding Gums Treatment

Mild gum recession can be treated by a professional deep cleaning in the affected area. During the deep cleaning, plaque and tartar is removed and the exposed root area is smoothed over, making it more difficult for bacteria to attach itself. Antibiotics can also be used to kill any remaining bacteria.

If a deep cleaning is not sufficient to treat the condition, because of excess loss of bone and deep pockets, receding gums surgery may be required.

Questions About Receding Gums

Q: What causes your gums to recede?
A: There are a number of factors that can cause your gums to recede, including periodontal diseases. These are bacterial gum infections that destroy gum tissue and supporting bone that hold your teeth in place, which is the main cause of gum recession.

Q: How Can I Prevent Gum Recession?
A: Taking good care of your mouth is the best way to prevent gum recession. Brush and floss daily and see your dentist at least twice a year. Your dentist may want to see you more often If you have gum recession.

  • Quitting smoking, if you smoke.
  • Eating a healthy, well-balanced diet.
  • Monitoring possible changes to your mouth.

Q: How can I make my gums healthier? 

  1. Use an electric toothbrush.
  2. Brush your teeth correctly at least twice a day.
  3. Use a toothbrush with a tongue scraper.
  4. Floss daily.
  5. Massage your gums.
  6. Use a receding gums mouthwash and a receding gums toothpaste, with fluoride.

If you see signs that your gums may be receding, please call Dr. Appletons office to schedule an exam.  905-668-6301.

(Information provided by Oral-B)
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15
May
2019
Any part of a tooth can be cracked.
The crack may be visible, though this is not always the case.  If a person experiences pain when chewing food, or if teeth suddenly become sensitive to hot and cold, one tooth may be cracked.

Any pain associated with a cracked tooth tends to come and go. This can make it more challenging for a dentist to locate the crack, especially if it is very small.

Anyone who suspects that they have a cracked tooth should make an appointment with the dentist as soon as possible. Leaving a cracked tooth untreated may lead to more problems, pain, and discomfort over time.

What are the symptoms?

When left untreated, a cracked tooth can lead to further pain and discomfort.

A cracked tooth will not necessarily cause any symptoms. People often have cracked teeth without even realizing it.

Some types of cracks are harmless and do not require treatment.

However, if a person notices the following symptoms, they may have a more extensive type of crack that requires dental treatment:

  • pain when eating, particularly when chewing or biting
  • swollen gums around the cracked tooth
  • teeth that have suddenly become sensitive to sweetness
  • teeth that have suddenly become sensitive to hot or cold foods
  • pain that tends to come and go
  • discomfort around the teeth and gums that is hard to pinpoint

What might cause teeth to crack?

There are many different reasons why teeth can crack.

Causes of a cracked tooth include:

  • biting down too hard on a piece of food
  • excessive grinding of the teeth
  • physical injury
  • a large existing filling, which can weaken the remaining tooth structure

A  sudden temperature change can also crack a tooth. For example, this could happen if a person burns their mouth while drinking tea, then drinks a glass of cold water to soothe the pain.

How are cracked teeth diagnosed?

A dentist will examine a person’s tooth before making a diagnosis.

A cracked tooth is not always simple to diagnose.

If the crack is not visible, a dentist will try to make a diagnosis by asking the person about their dental history and symptoms they are having.

The dentist will then examine the teeth, possibly using a magnifying glass to help to identify cracks.

They may also use a pointed instrument called a dental explorer, which catches on any rough, cracked edges on the teeth’s surface.

A dental dye can also make cracks more visible.

During the examination, the dentist will check the gums for signs of swelling because cracks in teeth tend to irritate the gums. They may also ask the person to bite down on something, to try and pinpoint the source of the pain.

A dentist may take an X-ray of the teeth. X-rays do not always show where cracks have formed, but they can reveal problems in the pulp of the teeth. If the pulp of a tooth appears to be unhealthy, this can suggest a crack.

Anyone who suspects that they have a cracked tooth should make an appointment with a dentist as soon as possible. It is especially important to do so when there are pain and discomfort.

In the meantime, the following home remedies can relieve uncomfortable symptoms:

  • rinsing the mouth with warm water, to keep it clean
  • taking over-the-counter pain medications, such as ibuprofen
  • using a cold compress against the cheek to help reduce swelling

The longer that a cracked tooth goes untreated, the more difficult it may be for a dentist to save the tooth. Complications may also occur, such as infection.

Tooth cracks are  more common in people over the age of 40, and women develop them more often than men.

Cracks can vary in length, depth, and the location on the tooth.

The smallest cracks are known as craze lines, and they develop within tooth enamel. A person is unlikely to notice a craze line, and no treatment is necessary unless it causes symptoms.

Treatment options

A dentist may use a crown to cover a cracked tooth.

The best treatment depends on the location of the crack and the extent of the damage.

If a crack is tiny and causes no discomfort, no treatment may be necessary.

Treatments for cracked teeth include:

  • repairing the crack with plastic resin, in a process called bonding
  • using a filling
  • using a crown, which is a cap that entirely covers the cracked tooth

In the most severe cases, when a crack has penetrated the pulp of the tooth, root canal treatment may be necessary. If a tooth is badly cracked, a dentist may remove the tooth altogether.

If a tooth with a filling becomes cracked, a dentist may need to remove the filling to examine the damage more thoroughly.

Cracked teeth can cause complications, particularly if they are left untreated. For example, an infection may occur. Signs of infection include:

  • increased pain
  • swelling of the gums
  • increased sensitivity to hot and cold
  • bad breathe
  • sore neck glands

How can cracked teeth be prevented?

Cracked teeth are not always preventable, but a few strategies can help. These include:

  • avoiding foods that are hard to chew, such as ice and unpopped popcorn kernels
  • putting an end to habits that may damage the teeth, such as grinding or biting on pens
  • trying not to clench the teeth
  • wearing a mouthguard to protect the teeth while playing sports

If a person grinds their teeth or clenches their jaw in their sleep, they may wish to talk to their dentist about wearing a niteguard at night.

Please call us at 905-668-6301 if you suspect your may have a cracked tooth.

 

 

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8
May
2019

Stained Teeth


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One of the most common questions I get asked is: How can I get whiter teeth?

There are many ways to enhance and freshen your smile. But there are also many ways to stop your teeth from becoming yellow in the first place. Sure, normal wear and tear can stain your teeth, but certain foods and bad habits speed up the process.

Certain foods can stain your teeth. It is widely known that coffee and tea (even green tea) can really darken your smile. Think about when you leave coffee in a mug for a period of time. It creates a brown stain in your cup that sometimes won’t come off with washing. Now, what if you rinse that cup immediately? It won’t stain. The same thing is true with your teeth. As long as you don’t let the staining food or drink sit on your teeth, you should be safe. Wash it out by drinking water immediately after you eat or drink a staining food.

Here are a few foods and habits that can easily cause staining of your teeth:

1. Coffee
2. Tea
3. Red wine
4. Dark sodas
5. Smoking and smokeless tobacco
6. Dark berries

Here are some easy, inexpensive home remedies:

1. Rinse your mouth with water immediately after having the staining food or drink.
2. Chew gum afterwards to let your saliva rinse your mouth out.
3. Use over-the-counter whitening rinses.
4. Try whitening strips.
5. Gently brush or rinse with baking soda or hydrogen peroxide.
6. Floss regularly or use floss with whitening treatments.

You can always have your teeth professionally whitened by your dentist and then maintain your teeth by following the above steps. In addition, we highly recommend giving up smoking, smokeless tobacco and soda, which can lead to other dental problems as well as stains.

If you are concerned with the stains on your teeth please call us at 905-668-6301 to schedule a complimentary whitening consultation.

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2
May
2019

Bad Breath


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Diagnosis

Your dentist will likely smell both the breath from your mouth and the breath from your nose and rate the odor on a scale. Because the back of the tongue is most often the source of the smell, your dentist may also scrape it and rate its odor.

Treatment

To reduce bad breath, help avoid cavities and lower your risk of gum disease, consistently practice good oral hygiene. Further treatment for bad breath can vary, depending on the cause. If your bad breath is thought to be caused by an underlying health condition, your dentist will likely refer you to your primary care provider.

For causes related to oral health, your dentist will work with you to help you better control that condition. Dental measures may include:

  • Mouth rinses and toothpastes. If your bad breath is due to a buildup of bacteria (plaque) on your teeth, your dentist may recommend a mouth rinse that kills the bacteria. Your dentist may also recommend a toothpaste that contains an antibacterial agent to kill the bacteria that cause plaque buildup.
  • Treatment of dental disease. If you have gum disease, you may be referred to a gum specialist (periodontist). Gum disease can cause gums to pull away from your teeth, leaving deep pockets that fill with odor-causing bacteria. Sometimes only professional cleaning removes these bacteria. Your dentist might also recommend replacing faulty tooth restorations, a breeding ground for bacteria.

Lifestyle and home remedies

To reduce or prevent bad breath:

  • Brush your teeth after you eat. Keep a toothbrush at work to use after eating. Brush using a fluoride-containing toothpaste at least twice a day, especially after meals. Toothpaste with antibacterial properties has been shown to reduce bad breath odors.
  • Floss at least once a day. Proper flossing removes food particles and plaque from between your teeth, helping to control bad breath.
  • Brush your tongue. Your tongue harbors bacteria, so carefully brushing it may reduce odors. People who have a coated tongue from a significant overgrowth of bacteria (from smoking or dry mouth, for example) may benefit from using a tongue scraper. Or use a toothbrush that has a built-in tongue cleaner.
  • Clean dentures or dental appliances. If you wear a bridge or a denture, clean it thoroughly at least once a day or as directed by your dentist. If you have a dental retainer or mouth guard, clean it each time before you put it in your mouth. Your dentist can recommend the best cleaning product.
  • Avoid dry mouth. To keep your mouth moist, avoid tobacco and drink plenty of water — not coffee, soft drinks or alcohol, which can lead to a drier mouth. Chew gum or suck on candy (preferably sugarless) to stimulate saliva. For chronic dry mouth, your dentist or physician may prescribe an artificial saliva preparation or an oral medication that stimulates the flow of saliva.
  • Adjust your diet. Avoid foods such as onions and garlic that can cause bad breath. Eating a lot of sugary foods is also linked with bad breath.
  • Regularly get a new toothbrush. Change your toothbrush when it becomes frayed, about every three to four months, and choose a soft-bristled toothbrush.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups. See your dentist on a regular basis — generally twice a year — to have your teeth or dentures examined and cleaned.

Preparing for your appointment

If you’re going to have your bad breath evaluated by your dentist, these tips can help:

  • Dentists generally prefer morning appointments for testing bad breath to reduce the chances that foods you eat during the day will hinder the exam.
  • Don’t wear perfume, scented lotions, or scented lipstick or lip gloss to your appointment, as these products could mask any odors.
  • If you’ve taken antibiotics within the last month, check with your dentist to see if your appointment needs to be rescheduled.

What to expect from your dentist

Your dentist will likely start with an evaluation of your medical history, asking questions such as:

  • When did you first begin to experience bad breath?
  • Is your bad breath occasional or continuous?
  • How often do you brush your teeth or clean your dentures?
  • How often do you floss?
  • What kinds of foods do you eat most often?
  • What medications and supplements do you take?
  • What health conditions do you have?
  • Do you breathe through your mouth?
  • Do you snore?
  • Do you have allergies or sinus problems?
  • What do you suspect might be causing your bad breath?
  • Have other people noticed and commented on your bad breath?

If you suspect that you might be suffering from bad breath please call us to schedule an assessment at 905-668-6301.

(Information provided by the Mayo clinic)
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24
Apr
2019

Nitrous oxide is a safe and effective sedative agent that is mixed with oxygen and inhaled through a small mask that fits over your nose to help you relax.

Nitrous oxide, sometimes called “laughing gas,” is one option your dentist may offer to help make you more comfortable during certain procedures. It is not intended to put you to sleep.

You will be able to hear and respond to any requests or directions the dentist may have. Your dentist will ask you to breathe normally through your nose, and within a few short minutes you should start to feel the effects of the nitrous oxide.

You may feel light-headed or a tingling in your arms and legs. Some people say their arms and legs feel heavy. Ultimately, you should feel calm and comfortable.

The effects of nitrous oxide wear off soon after the mask is removed.

 

Talk to Dr. Bana  about whether nitrous oxide would be a good option for you.

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